Volume 4, Issue 2, December 2020, Page: 38-45
Effects of Abattoir Waste on the Surface Water Quality of Dei-Dei River, Abuja, Nigeria
Jibrin Ahmadu, Department of Pollution Control and Environmental Health, Federal Ministry of Environment, Abuja, Nigeria
Ogechukwu Franca Eze, Department of Pollution Control and Environmental Health, Federal Ministry of Environment, Abuja, Nigeria
Ofigo Kesiena, Infantini Systems Consult LTD. Abuja, Nigeria
Bessie Hanis, National Biotechnology Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria
Fidelis Micheal, Universal Basic Education, Abuja, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 31, 2020;       Accepted: Apr. 1, 2020;       Published: Aug. 31, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijec.20200402.11      View  47      Downloads  17
Abstract
This study has investigated the Effects of Abattoir Waste on the Surface Water Quality of Dei-Dei River, Abuja. It assessed the impacts of abattoir waste disposal on Dei-Dei River, biological properties such as E-coli, Faecal Streptococci, Total Coliform Count (TCC) and Cryptosporidium Oocyst (Co), with results compared with WHO standards. Field methods included consultation with Health and Water Quality Expert, collection of water samples at varying distance and laboratory analysis of water samples using standard techniques. The analysis at the upstream, revealed that at point 1, E.coli was 2.00cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml and TCC was 18cfu/ml above 10 cfu/ml benchmark for raw water respectively. At Point 2, E.Coli was 1.00 cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml while TCC is 12.00 cfu/ml. At Point 3, E. Coli was 1.00 cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml while TCC is 20.00 cfu/ml and above the bench mark for raw water. The midstream of the study area, revealed that at Point 1, E.coli was 3.00cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml and TCC was 25cfu/ml above 10 cfu/ml benchmark for raw water respectively. At Point 2, E.Coli was 2.00- cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml while TCC is 22.00 cfu/m, Co 1 log reduction l. At Point 3, E. Coli was 1.00 cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml while TCC is 9.00 cfu/ml. The result of the analysis of sample collected at the downstream of the study area revealed that at Point 1, E.coli was 5.00cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml and TCC was 32cfu/ml above 10 cfu/ml, Co 2 log reduction and within the benchmark for raw water respectively. At Point 2, E.Coli was 3.00 cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml while TCC is 38.00 cfu/ml, Co1 log reduction and within the Benchmark for raw water respectively. At Point 3, E. Coli was 1.00 cfu/ml above 0 cfu/ml while TCC is 35.00 cfu/ml and Co 0.00 log reduction and within the benchmark for raw water respectively, while at Point 1 and Point 2, E.Coli and TCC were above the bench mark for raw water. Presence of these micro-biological components are indications that the surface water of the study area may likely be responsible for diseases such as typhoid fever, diarrhoea and cholera if used for drinking purpose. The study has also made recommendations to address the problems revealed such as; improvement of sanitation of the study area, provision of adequate waste management facilities while sensitization of the people is given priority, ensuring clean water in the area and efforts to stop dumping of Abattoir waste into the river and at the river bank.
Keywords
Effects, Abattoir Waste, Surface Water, Quality, Dei-Dei River, Abuja
To cite this article
Jibrin Ahmadu, Ogechukwu Franca Eze, Ofigo Kesiena, Bessie Hanis, Fidelis Micheal, Effects of Abattoir Waste on the Surface Water Quality of Dei-Dei River, Abuja, Nigeria, International Journal of Environmental Chemistry. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2020, pp. 38-45. doi: 10.11648/j.ijec.20200402.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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